Smithsonian Article: The Forgotten Dust Bowl Novel That Rivaled The Grapes of Wrath

Filed under: Joy's Work — Administrator at 6:20 am on Tuesday, May 24, 2016

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I’m so excited to announce my first article in The Smithsonian, The Forgotten Dust Bowl Novel That Rivaled The Grapes of Wrath.

It’s about Sanora Babb, who wrote a great Dust Bowl novel called Whose Names Are Unknown the same time John Steinbeck wrote The Grapes of Wrath. In fact, Babb used much of the same research material as Steinbeck and saw many of the same things. When The Grapes of Wrath came out, Babb’s book was shelved for 65 years. Read the article to find out more!

Humor Article: How To Tell If You’re A Lady In A 1950s Melodrama

Filed under: Joy's Work — Administrator at 6:08 am on Tuesday, May 24, 2016

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I have a short humor piece in Defenestration titled How To Tell If You’re A Lady In A 1950s Melodrama. I watched a lot of bad movies to write it, so I know it’s accurate.

Sample:

Sure, his relentless stalking caused an accident that made you go blind, and then he pretended to be someone else to make you fall in love with him, but he’s a great guy, and you won’t have people pitying him for marrying a blind woman. The only solution is to go away and love him from afar.

Read the rest here.

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I Was On An All About Beer Panel

Filed under: Joy's Work — Administrator at 8:37 am on Tuesday, April 12, 2016

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Earlier this year, I was on a beer panel for All About Beer magazine. That means I got to sit in a room with other panelists, taste beers, and come up with descriptions of nuances and flavors. It was fun. Check out the March issue to see which beers we liked the best.

Book Review: The Nest By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

Filed under: Joy's Work — Administrator at 8:08 am on Tuesday, April 12, 2016

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Check it out! I have a book review up at KQED on The Nest By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney. Click here to read Review: Is ‘The Nest’ Worth Its Famed Seven-Figure Advance?

Facts About I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings In Mental Floss

Filed under: Joy's Work — joy at 9:17 am on Friday, March 4, 2016

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Check out my most recent Mental Floss post, 11 Facts About I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Maya Angelou was such a fascinating person.

Truth Is Stranger Than Children’s Fiction In Writer’s Digest

Filed under: Joy's Work — joy at 9:07 am on Friday, March 4, 2016

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I have an article in the March/April issue of Writer’s Digest titled “When Truth Is Stranger Than (Children’s) Fiction.” Next time you’re in a bookstore, pick up a copy and check it out.

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Article: Secret Garden In Mental Floss

Filed under: Joy's Work — Administrator at 3:59 pm on Tuesday, February 2, 2016

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I have a new post up at Mental Floss: 8 Lovely Facts About The Secret Garden. I was surprised to learn that Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic book is basically an allegory for Christian Science. Weird.

Click here to read the article.

My Article Among Biggest Literary Stories Of 2015

Filed under: Joy's Work — joy at 7:38 am on Thursday, December 31, 2015

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Literary Hub mentioned my article in The Atlantic about literary journals charging reading fees to submitting writers among The 50 Biggest Literary Stories of the Year. It’s under number 31: Literary Journals Making Money Off Slush Piles. Check it out!

Mental Floss: 9 Mournful Facts About Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”

Filed under: Joy's Work — joy at 10:06 am on Friday, October 30, 2015

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I wrote another Halloween-themed Mental Floss post: 9 Mournful Facts About Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.”

Ravens can really talk. Here’s a video of a raven saying “nevermore.”

The Atlantic: Should Literary Journals Charge Writers Just to Read Their Work?

Filed under: Joy's Work — joy at 7:20 am on Monday, October 26, 2015

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I’m excited to share an article I wrote for The Atlantic on literary journal reading fees. It looks into whether literary journals should charge writers fees to submit their writing, an important issue that needs more discussion.

Check out: Should Literary Journals Charge Writers Just to Read Their Work?

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